Posted by: Andy Porter | February 3, 2009

First Impressions and Greeting Customers

First impressions are everything.

We have all seen examples of this in our personal lives. When we meet someone new their appearance, tone of voice, manners (or lack of!) all have a very big effect on us.

When a customer calls or goes into an office, business or agency the first person they talk to represents the entire company. This goes even further with people who are traveling to new places: just ONE rotten experience with a rude “customer service person” can ever after sour the person’s attitude to the entire city, region, or country!!!

To the customer YOU are the company. A good first impression starts a positive relationship with your customers. On the other hand a poor first impression can sometime end the relationship right there. And when you factor in word of mouth and how many other people the customer may talk to about their bad experience with your company you can see how important first impressions can be.

A bad first impression is not impossible to undo, but it sure takes a lot of effort. The point is if you make a great first impression things are a LOT easier.

Let’s look at things from the customer’s point of view:

When a customer calls or walks into a business for the first time they may be: happy, anxious, worried, lost, angry, frustrated, excited, or possibly all of the above! When you, as a customer, are new to a business you don’t know anyone, you’re not familiar with how things work. You don’t know if you’re going to like it there, if they will provide good service, if they will be friendly or helpful. There are a lot of doubts and questions! Many customers go in to a business for the first time actually expecting things to go badly. Some even “get ready for battle” before heading off to a new restaurant, hotel, doctor or auto mechanic.

When you meet anyone new “little things” can affect your attitude towards the person very fast. If you already have a relationship with someone, and that person has a bad day or is in a bad mood it probably won’t ruin or end your relationship. But if the person is new to you just one or two small negative points could end your relationship with the person right there.

Speaking of first impressions, it is vital that you, as the customer service professional, do not make any assumptions about customers. Judging a customer by their appearance or how they speak is a huge mistake.

So, anyone working on the front lines is supposed to do everything to make sure that they give all customers a great first impression and at the same time be sure to NOT let your first impressions of the customer in any way prevent you from delivering the best possible service. This can be a tall order sometimes.

Greeting a customer

Always make eye contact with the customer the first second they come in. Even if you are with another customer or on the phone, make eye contact and acknowledge that they are there immediately. A simple gesture tells the new person that you see them and will be right with them.

Smile! Smile! Smile! Smile! Smile! Smile!

Your greeting should tell the customer, “I am glad you’re here!”

Greetings such as:

  • “Good morning! How can I help you today?”
  • “Hello, how is your day going so far?” What can I help you with today?”
  • “Hi, we haven’t seen you in a while!”
  • “Welcome, what can I do for you today?”
  • “Good afternoon! What can we do for you today?”

A friendly greeting immediately disarms the person and sets them at ease. It sets the tone for the rest of the interaction. No matter what the customer’s emotional state this will make things better. This is probably the single most important point for anyone working in any position where they greet customers.

Every person who walks in the door

Every person who comes in MUST be greeted in the most friendly way possible: new customers, old customers, customers who come in all the time, all of them. Repair people, delivery people, people who are lost and need directions, everyone. Remember, even if the person who comes is not and never will be a customer they still will relay their experiences with your company, good or bad, to everyone they talk to.

If there is going to be a wait, tell the customer about it. Explain why, offer coffee, tea, etc. then every 10 to 15 minutes give the customer an update. Have gift cards from a local store, restaurant or espresso stand available for customers who have to wait too long. Always tell the truth about how long the wait will be. Saying it will be “just a few more minutes” when you know it will half an hour only makes things worse!

Things you should never do:

  • If the customer is early for their appointment NEVER communicate in any way that this is bad or creates a problem. The point is that the person arrived! That’s great! Go give the customer a hug! Don’t berate them for the “crime” of being early. In fact you should not use the word “early”. If the customer comes early the first thing to do is to tell them how happy you are to see them. You can say something like, “Just have a seat and I will go (or call) and see if they are ready for you.” Or something positive, just work it out so that what you are saying is not “You’re early and you’re RUINING my schedule!!!”
  • Carry on a personal conversation with another employee, or phone call, while servicing a customer. This is particularly important when the customer first comes in. If you are at the front desk with another co-worker and a customer walks in you need to end any conversations you are having and look up at the customer with a smile BEFORE they reach the counter. Other wise the customer will get the impression that they are distracting you from your more “important” duties.
  • Carry on ANY negative type of conversation ABOUT ANYTHING if there is a customer with earshot. This includes conversations about: other staff, other customers, other competitors.
  • Convey the idea, feeling or attitude of being “way too busy”, “overworked” frantic or ANYTHING ELSE which would tell the customer that their being there is a problem. Generally customers don’t want to hear about your problems at work or in your personal life. Just be positive, friendly, cheerful and happy to help them NO MATTER HOW SWAMPED YOU ARE.

Click here to learn about our WelcomeTeam Training program.

About these ads

Responses

  1. Thank you for the helpful information. I bookmarked your site, and I hope you keep up the good work on making your blog a success!

  2. Just passing by. BTW, your website has great content!

  3. Hello!
    Very Interesting post! Thank you for such interesting resource!
    PS: Sorry for my bad english, I’v just started to learn this language ;)
    See you!
    Your, Raiul Baztepo

  4. I will pass this on to the GS 101 and GS 201 classes and the staff and faculty. It never hurts to be reminded!

  5. Thank you! Kerrie is right…great info for the GS201 class!

  6. I enjoyed reading this article and this is information that I have shared numerous times with students when I previously taught the Career Developmet classes. Now, that I am teaching the Career Management class – I am still continuing to share the message that First impressions are truly everything!

    I agree this is something that we should definitely remind students of! This information is very helpful! Thanks!

  7. I really enjoyed this information. I have experienced much of this to be very true. I will pass this on to my students because this information is the key to success.

  8. Beginning with grad prep and carried throughout all seminars and communication with students – the importance of good attitude is stressed. Regardless of the chosen field of study, positive customer service is a necessity. I have bookmarked this page and will share it with my students.

  9. I couldn’t agree more! We call our main secretary the “Director of First Impressions”.

  10. The information provided was excellent. Wow customer services is what we need to deliver daily.

  11. I have been a champion of “First Impressions” for years. I encourage my students and colleagues that they are all people of influence. The first impression speaks volumes about the environment the customer/client/patient has just stepped into. Thank you for a great article.

  12. First impressions are SOOOOO crucial. Your initial greeting will either impress and draw someone in, or depress someone and cause them to not want to return. Absolutely critical!

  13. These are excellent fundamentals for success in any area.

  14. This article makes me realize how important and how important that old saying is: “You never get a 2nd chance to make a 1st impression”!

  15. Definitely great information!

  16. This was valuable information, sometimes we could forget that the prospect/future graduate is why we are here and this is why we need to treat them with the upmost respect and consideration 1st Impressions are extremely important and this article reinforces the point to the fullest.

  17. Great information for reps!

  18. This training material is well worth reading, and will help many reps put some key fundamentals in perspective. I know the job can sometimes be really challenging. Especially when there is a large work load, this will help us remember to keep our future graduate enrollees in high regard.

  19. This information helped me to understand more ways to engage the potential students. These things will be in my mind when making that important first contact.

  20. I’m a stickler for first impressions, as are most people. Everything that is done or said at the first meeting is crucial to building a successful relationship. Just as the article mentioned, the little things are sometimes whats noticed most. I have been to offices and seen people slunched down in their chairs, shoes off, on their cell phones, etc. What a horrible impression that gives off. As a career service coordinator its important to model the characteristics and behaviors we are asking our students to exhibit in the workplace.

  21. Great article! First impressions are absolutely one of the most important parts of customer service.

  22. This training peice is most effective in the sense that we tend not to consider our soft skills as being a critical part of the equation. This is truly invaluable information which should in some respects be taught daily.

  23. Great Article

  24. First impression are very important but I feel the second call is just as important to set a rapport.

  25. Excellent advice and information! Sometimes we forget that we are always on display. The client IS always first.

  26. thanks fr ur help…but i need the opening welcome script for an canadian customer through phone

  27. [...] the Word of Mouth Marketing Blog puts it, many customers believe things will go badly when they enter a [...]

  28. Hey there! Do you use Twitter? I’d like to follow you if that would be ok. I’m absolutely enjoying your blog and look forward
    to new updates.

  29. Hi there, yup this piece of writing is really nice and I have learned lot of things
    from it regarding blogging. thanks.

  30. I wandered on here a few weeks ago and I absolutely can’t get enough! Please keep writing!

  31. Good post. I learn something totally new and
    challenging on blogs I stumbleupon everyday. It’s always exciting to read through articles from other writers and practice a little something from other websites.

  32. Hey there I am so delighted I found your blog, I really found you
    by accident, while I was browsing on Bing for something else, Anyways I am here now and would just
    like to say cheers for a remarkable post and a all round exciting
    blog (I also love the theme/design), I don’t have time to go through it all at the moment but I have book-marked it and also included your RSS feeds, so when I have time I will be back to read a lot more, Please do keep up the excellent work.

    • Claudette, Thank you very much!

  33. Woah! I’m really enjoying the template/theme of this website. It’s simple, yet effective.
    A lot of times it’s difficult to get that “perfect balance” between user friendliness and visual appeal. I must say you’ve done a fantastic job with this.
    Additionally, the blog loads very quick for me on Internet explorer.
    Outstanding Blog!

  34. I really love the greeting tips that are given here. They seem to be really helpful!

  35. wow G8 SIR !
    it’s vry helpful me thnk u……………………,

  36. Solid article. I’m studying something similar here at Indiana State University. It’s
    definitely helpful to learn new stuff from fellow writers and
    obtain information from new sources. I’d like to incorporate some of
    this material on my own webpage (if you don’t mind). And of course, I’ll post a link to your site at wordpress.com on my own page. Kudos for sharing.

  37. It’s going to be ending of mine day, however before ending I am reading this enormous paragraph to increase my knowledge.

  38. An impressive share! I have just forwarded this onto a
    friend who has been conducting a little research on
    this. And he actually ordered me lunch because I discovered it for him.
    .. lol. So allow me to reword this…. Thanks for the meal!
    ! But yeah, thanx for spending some time to talk about this issue here
    on your blog.

  39. Usually I do not read article on blogs, however I wish to say that this write-up very pressured
    me to check out and do so! Your writing style has been surprised me.
    Thank you, quite nice post.

  40. Hi, I do think this is an excellent site. I stumbledupon it ;) I’m going to revisit yet again
    since I book-marked it. Money and freedom is the
    greatest way to change, may you be rich and continue to guide others.

  41. […] You represent the company. If you are greeting people in a business setting, how you greet them will not only be their first impression of you, but of the company you work for as well, says Customer Service Boot Camp. […]

  42. Hi, I log on to your new stuff on a regular basis.
    Your writing style is witty, keep doing what you’re doing!

  43. good


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: